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New York Times Book News

Books of The Times: Review: Evan Thomas’s ‘Being Nixon: A Man Divided,’ a Glossy Biography
Mr. Thomas compresses a sprawling life that encompassed great triumphs, acute internal contradictions and public shaming on a grand scale.









Books of The Times: Review: ‘Multitudinous Heart,’ Newly Translated Poetry by Carlos Drummond de Andrade
The book, with translations by Richard Zenith, includes samples from every phase of the revered Brazilian poet’s career.









Word of the Day

stringent

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 04, 2015 is:

stringent • \STRIN-junt\  • adjective
1 : tight, constricted 2 : marked by rigor, strictness, or severity 3 : marked by money scarcity and credit strictness

Examples:
Brandon and Sarah had to adjust to living on a stringent budget during the four months when Brandon was looking for a job.

"In an effort to address the perils of climate change, the county supervisors voted 3–2 to adopt the most stringent greenhouse-gas-emission restrictions of any county in California…." — Nick Welsh, Santa Barbara (California) Independent, May 21, 2015

Did you know?
Words that are synonymous with stringent include rigid, which implies uncompromising inflexibility ("rigid rules of conduct"), and rigorous, which suggests hardship and difficulty ("the rigorous training of firefighters"). Also closely related is strict, which emphasizes undeviating conformity to rules, standards, or requirements ("strict enforcement of the law"). Stringent usually involves severe, tight restrictions or limitations ("the college has stringent admissions rules"). That's logical. After all, rigorous and rigid are both derived from rigēre, the Latin word meaning "to be stiff," and stringent and strict developed from the Latin verb stringere, meaning "to bind tight."